Tuesday, May 23, 2017

30 Free Google Drawings Graphic Organizers

Several years ago when I started making webinars, my first one was on creating Graphic Organizers with Google Drawings. This was before I had started the this blog, so I never really shared all of that information in an official blog post. Until now...

Graphic organizers are a great tool to share information, explain a concept, or illustrate a relationship using elements including images, shapes, text, colors, and connecting lines. They can be used in education with any age group or subject area.

There are many excellent tools for creating graphic organizers. Some are installable programs, while others are online. Some are free, while other cost money. Educators and students should be encouraged to try out many different tools to determine what works best for them and for specific situations.

However, one great choice for graphic organizers is Google Drawings. See below for directions on how to create graphic organizers with Google Drawings (including a help guide and a recorded webinar) as well as 30 free sample graphic organizers that you can copy, use, and modify as needed.


Tutorials

For written directions on how to create graphic organizers with Google Drawings, see my help guide linked below.


For a 1-hour recorded training webinar, see the video below. (It was my first webinar, so it may be a little rough around the edges.)




Sample Graphic Organizers

Click the links below to get your own copy of any of these Google Drawing templates for graphic organizers. In each template, there are directions off the left side of the Drawings canvas. Feel free to use and/or modify these as needed, although please leave my attribution and blog link in the Drawings when you share them.


Word Study Diagram - Google Drawing link



State or Country Research Web - Google Drawing link



5 Senses Diagram - Google Drawing link



Frayer Model 1 - Google Drawing link



Frayer Model 2 - Google Drawing link



Compare and Contrast - Google Drawing link



Cause and Effect 1 - Google Drawing link



Cause and Effect 2 - Google Drawing link



Fishbone Diagram - Google Drawing link



Season Sorter - Google Drawing link



Question Chart - Google Drawing link



Story Map 1 - Google Drawing link



Story Map 2 - Google Drawing link



Character Description - Google Drawing link



Sandwich Chart - Google Drawing link



Main Idea and Details - Google Drawing link



2 Circle Venn Diagram - Google Drawing link



3 Circle Venn Diagram - Google Drawing link



3 Level Tree Diagram - Google Drawing link



Cluster Web - Google Drawing link



3 Step Cycle - Google Drawing link



4 Step Cycle - Google Drawing link



6 Step Cycle - Google Drawing link



3 Step Sequence - Google Drawing link



4 Step Sequence - Google Drawing link



6 Step Sequence - Google Drawing link



4 Circle Web - Google Drawing link



5 Circle Web - Google Drawing link



6 Circle Web - Google Drawing link



9 Circle Web - Google Drawing link



Conclusion

If you have any of your own Google Drawing graphic organizers, please consider sharing them in the comments below. Or if you have a request for a diagram, let me know and I will be glad to create it and add it to the collection for everyone to use.


Post by Eric Curts. Bring me to your school, organization, or conference with over 50 PD sessions to choose from. Connect with me on Twitter at twitter.com/ericcurts and on Google+ at plus.google.com/+EricCurts1

6 comments:

  1. I have recommended your collection to quite a few people. Wondering why you don't include some of your other creations in this list, such as your Twitter template?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aaron, you are right, I have a bunch of other templates as well. However, for this post I just decided to focus on graphic organizers (although I guess even that could have a broader definition that what I went with). Thanks for sharing!

      Delete
  2. Eric, these are awesome! We are 1:1 with iPads, have you had any success with these on that device? Usually we use Macbooks when working with Google Drawings, but I'd love to use in a more broad way. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love it. Thanks so much for this valuable post.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Another reason to use drawings to create graphic organizers as a prewriting activity is that they embed directly into a Google doc so students can easily refer to them while writing. Students can remove the drawings from the document before turning it in or keep the GO in the doc for teacher reference.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Freedom APK is what comes to mind when it comes to surfing and playing premium game without shelling out a dime for it.
    Many users have complained that there are no free lunches in life but this app makes us believe otherwise. Want to know more about the Freedom app? Check out this Website

    ReplyDelete